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SECURITY STATE BANK OF FERGUS FALLS

BANK SPECIAL HOURS

MONDAY, 16 2017 - MARTIN LUTHER KING Jr. DAY

***LOBBY CLOSED***

~~~~~~~~~~

DRIVE THRU & WALKUP WILL BE OPEN FROM

7:45 AM TO 3:00 PM

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Winter Survival Kit List

How to Make a Winter Survival Kit

Everyone should carry a Winter Survival Kit in their car. In an emergency, it could save your life and the lives of your passengers. Here is what you need:

  • A shovel
  • Windshield scraper and small broom
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Battery powered radio
  • Water
  • Snack food including energy bars
  • Raisins and mini candy bars
  • Matches and small candles
  • Extra hats, socks and mittens
  • First aid kit with pocket knife
  • Necessary medications
  • Blankets or sleeping bag
  • tow chain or rope
  • Road salt, sand, or cat litter for traction
  • Booster cables
  • Emergency flares and reflectors
  • Fluorescent distress flag and whistle to attract attention
  • Cell phone adapter to plug into lighter

Kit tips:

  • Reverse batteries in flashlight to avoid accidental switching and burnout.
  • Store items in the passenger compartment in case the trunk is jammed or frozen shut.
  • Choose small packages of food that you can eat hot or cold.

911 tips:

  • If possible, call 911 on your cell phone. Provide your location, condition of everyone in the vehicle and the problem you're experiencing.
  • Follow instructions: you may be told to stay where you are until help arrives.
  • Do not hang up until you know who you have spoken with and what will happen next.
  • If you must leave the vehicle, write down your name, address, phone number and destination. Place the piece of paper inside the front windshield for someone to see.

Survival tips:

  • Prepare your vehicle: Make sure you keep your gas tank at least half full.
  • Be easy to find: Tell someone where you are going and the route you will take.
  • If stuck: Tie a florescent flag (from your kit) on your antenna or hang it out the window. At night, keep your dome light on. Rescue crews can see a small glow at a distance. To reduce battery drain, use emergency flashers only if you hear approaching vehicles. If you're with someone else, make sure at least one person is awake and keeping watch for help at all times.
  • Stay in your vehicle: Walking in a storm can be very dangerous. You might become lost or exhausted. Your vehicle is a good shelter.
  • Avoid Overexertion: Shoveling snow or pushing your car takes a lot of effort in storm conditions. Don't risk a heart attack or injury. That work can also make you hot and sweaty. Wet clothing loses insulation value, making you susceptible to hypothermia.
  • Fresh Air: It's better to be cold and awake than comfortably warm and sleepy. Snow can plug your vehicle's exhaust system and cause deadly carbon monoxide gas to enter your car. Only run the engine for 10 minutes an hour and make sure the exhaust pipe is free of snow and keeping a window open a crack while running the engine is also a good idea.
  • Don't expect to be comfortable: You want to survive until you're found.

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Yahoo Breached!!

On September 22, Yahoo warned that a security breach of its networks affected more than 500 million account holders. Today, the company said it uncovered a separate incident in which thieves stole data on more than a billion user accounts, and that the newly disclosed breach is separate from the incident disclosed in September.

  • If you do not use your Yahoo account a lot. Close it down because it's a risk. If you use it every day:
    • Open your browser and go to Yahoo. Do not use a link in any email. Reset your password and make it a strong, complex password or rather a pass-phrase. 
  • If you were using that same password on multiple websites, you need to stop that right now. Using the same password all over the place is an invitation to get hacked. If you did use your Yahoo passwords on other sites, go to those sites and change the password there too. Also change the security questions and make the answer something non-obvious.
  • At the house, use a free password manager that can generate hard-to-hack passwords, keep and remember them for you.
  • Watch out for any phishing emails that relate to Yahoo in any way and ask for information.
  • Now would also be a good time to use Yahoo Account Key, a simple authentication tool that eliminates the need to use a password altogether.

We hope this helps and that you stay safe out there.

SSB IT STAFF

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Verified by Visa

Shop online with greater protection! We've partnered with Visa to offer additional protection when using your debit card online. Registering with Verified by Visa lets you create your own username and password. Once activated, you'll receive a password entry page when shopping at participating Verified by Visa online merchants – so only you can use your card.

Register now at www.ssbfergus.com/verifiedbyvisa or the next time you shop at a participating online merchant.

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Traveling Securely

Winter Holiday Traveling, for many of us, that means it’s time to get away! It’s not surprising that many cybercriminals target travelers. Luckily, with a little care, it’s possible to protect yourself and avoid potential problems.

Sharing isn’t always caring:
     Avoid publicly posting details of where and when you’ll be traveling. When you reveal these specifics, you’re providing information that could be used by criminals to target your home or your family while you’re gone. 
     Sending private posts and photos during your vacation to family and friends is OK, but if you post them publicly, you increase the risk of someone using that information for malicious activities. Also, ensure your children and friends understand the risks associated with posting your vacation plans.

Accessing public computers and Wi-Fi:
     Don’t use public computers and open wireless networks for sensitive online transactions. Wi-Fi® spots in airports, hotels, coffee shops and other public places can be convenient; however, they’re often unsecure and can leave you at risk. 
     If you’re accessing the internet through an unsecured network, you should be aware malicious individuals might be able to eavesdrop on your connection. This could allow them to steal your financial information, login credentials or other sensitive information. Any public Wi-Fi should be considered “unsecure.” 
     Consider turning off features on your computer or mobile device that allow them to automatically connect to Wi-Fi and other services such as social media websites.
     Also, consider using a cellular 3G / 4G connection as a hotspot, which is generally safer than an open Wi-Fi connection. If you do connect through your hotel’s Wi-Fi, verify the name of the Wi-Fi hotspot with a hotel staff member.

Know the law:
      Keep in mind that if you’re traveling abroad, different countries have different laws, which may allow government employees or law enforcement full access to your device without your knowledge or permission. It’s also important to know the local laws regarding online behavior, as some online behaviors, such as posting disparaging comments or pictures of illegal activity on social media websites, can be illegal.

Recommendations: Below are tips to protect your important information.

1. Use discretion when posting information online. Consider keeping your social media pages private, so only authorized individuals can visit.

2. Password protect your devices so if they’re lost or stolen, the information is protected. Also, enable device tracking.

3. Make sure your laptop and other mobile devices have the latest patches installed. Your software vendor should notify you whenever an update is available. Set your devices to automatically update.

4. Use of security software is a necessity. Some programs can also locate a missing or stolen phone, tablet or other similar device. Some devices can even back up and remotely wipe all data from them, if reported stolen.

5. Make sure you have anti-virus software installed, updated and running.

6. Don’t access sensitive accounts (for example: financial institutions, credit cards, etc.) or conduct sensitive transactions over public networks, including hotel and airport Wi-Fi and business centers or cafes. Whenever possible, use wired connections instead of Bluetooth® or Wi-Fi connections.

7. Don’t plug USB cables into public charging stations. Only connect USB-powered devices using the intended AC power adapter.

Brought to you by:  Center for Internet Security - "STOP-THINK-CONNECT"

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